Exercises

These exercises are based on our teaching philosophy, and they have been tweaked and revised in real courses.

These exercises are based on our teaching philosophy, and they have been tweaked and revised in real courses.

by Melissa Antinori

Students read, analyze, and transcribe Civil War correspondence and conduct secondary research to create introductions and annotations to their assigned letter.


by Deborah Mutnick, Sara Campbell and William Burgos

Students conduct a close analysis of slave bills of sale and indentures to better understand the legal and social history of manumission in the north.


by Peter Catapano

In a single visit, students in a U.S. history survey course examine historical maps and guidebooks to learn more about early 20th-century Brooklyn theaters.


by M. Justin Davis

Students in an Effective Speaking course craft and deliver impromptu group speeches about primary sources examined in the archives.


by Athena Devlin

Students examine primary sources related to the Civil War draft and discuss contemporary public opinion about the war as well as the role that race and class played in the drafting of men.


by Leah Dilworth

In an interdisciplinary honors elective called “Rubbish!”, students examine and analyze historical documents on various aspects of garbage and waste.


by Alexandria M. Egler

Students analyze Civil War-era correspondence to better understand the relationship between religion and politics during the war.


by Sara R. Haviland

Students visit the archives three times to examine documents related to the civil rights movement in the north as part of a scaffolded research project.


by Kimberly Faith Jones

Students examine documents related to runaway slaves and compare their findings to a secondary source on the same subject.


by Robin Michals

Students examine daguerreotypes, lantern slides, and silver-gelatin prints to analyze the technological development and changing social meaning of photography over time.


by Eric Platt

Students select an item from a wide array of primary sources about Coney Island, then craft a research paper around their chosen document.


by Jody R. Rosen

Inspired by research in the archives, students create a group walking tour, film themselves giving one stop on that tour, and embed the videos on a publicly-accessible Google map.


by Jennifer Wingate

Students analyze Civil War-era envelopes as representations of popular imagery in the mid-19th century.


by Geoff D. Zylstra

Students examine suites of primary sources related to various topics in early American history and produce a final research paper.


by Melissa Antinori

Students read, analyze, and transcribe Civil War correspondence and conduct secondary research to create introductions and annotations to their assigned letter.


by Deborah Mutnick, Sara Campbell and William Burgos

Students conduct a close analysis of slave bills of sale and indentures to better understand the legal and social history of manumission in the north.


by Peter Catapano

In a single visit, students in a U.S. history survey course examine historical maps and guidebooks to learn more about early 20th-century Brooklyn theaters.


by M. Justin Davis

Students in an Effective Speaking course craft and deliver impromptu group speeches about primary sources examined in the archives.


by Athena Devlin

Students examine primary sources related to the Civil War draft and discuss contemporary public opinion about the war as well as the role that race and class played in the drafting of men.


by Leah Dilworth

In an interdisciplinary honors elective called “Rubbish!”, students examine and analyze historical documents on various aspects of garbage and waste.


by Alexandria M. Egler

Students analyze Civil War-era correspondence to better understand the relationship between religion and politics during the war.


by Sara R. Haviland

Students visit the archives three times to examine documents related to the civil rights movement in the north as part of a scaffolded research project.


by Kimberly Faith Jones

Students examine documents related to runaway slaves and compare their findings to a secondary source on the same subject.


by Robin Michals

Students examine daguerreotypes, lantern slides, and silver-gelatin prints to analyze the technological development and changing social meaning of photography over time.


by Eric Platt

Students select an item from a wide array of primary sources about Coney Island, then craft a research paper around their chosen document.


by Jody R. Rosen

Inspired by research in the archives, students create a group walking tour, film themselves giving one stop on that tour, and embed the videos on a publicly-accessible Google map.


by Jennifer Wingate

Students analyze Civil War-era envelopes as representations of popular imagery in the mid-19th century.


by Geoff D. Zylstra

Students examine suites of primary sources related to various topics in early American history and produce a final research paper.