Models for History Survey Courses
Models for History Survey Courses
by Peter Catapano

When teaching the U.S. history survey, this professor draws on his own area of expertise and uses a collaborative class website to make the most out of a single visit to the archives.


by Sara R. Haviland

This professor models historical research methods for students through a scaffolded project that culminates in a final paper. Over the course of three visits to the archives, students move from analyzing one document to examining an entire archival folder.


by Kimberly Faith Jones

A history professor discusses how, in a survey course with lots of material to cover, she made time for a visit to the archives to examine runaway slave ads with her students.


by Geoff D. Zylstra

A history professor argues that by doing archival research, students interpret evidence and draw original conclusions, thus exhibiting the “higher order” skills described by Bloom’s Taxonomy.


by Peter Catapano

When teaching the U.S. history survey, this professor draws on his own area of expertise and uses a collaborative class website to make the most out of a single visit to the archives.


by Sara R. Haviland

This professor models historical research methods for students through a scaffolded project that culminates in a final paper. Over the course of three visits to the archives, students move from analyzing one document to examining an entire archival folder.


by Kimberly Faith Jones

A history professor discusses how, in a survey course with lots of material to cover, she made time for a visit to the archives to examine runaway slave ads with her students.


by Geoff D. Zylstra

A history professor argues that by doing archival research, students interpret evidence and draw original conclusions, thus exhibiting the “higher order” skills described by Bloom’s Taxonomy.